Posts Currently viewing the tag: "economic growth in Right to Work States"

Auto manufacturing in Right To Work states continues to grow. Mazda Toyota Manufacturing (MTM), the joint venture between automakers Mazda Motor Corp. and Toyota Motor Corp., plans to make an additional $830 million investment in Alabama to incorporate new cutting-edge manufacturing technologies to its production lines and provide enhanced training to its workforce of…(Read More)

Master Manufacturing Group (MMG) will invest $3.9 million to renovate and upgrade an existing manufacturing Dayton, Tennessee facility. More current California employers are expected to head East towards Right To Work states. Founded in 1956, Master Manufacturing Group, formerly known as Woodmack Products, Inc., provides custom tube and pipe manufacturing services, specializing in the…(Read More)

Those who keep up with business trends are cognizant that Right to Work states enjoy many benefits:  more jobs, more factories, higher standard of living, more job security, lower taxes.  An expert gvies 6 reasons predicting Tesla will open a factory in Right to Work Texas.  Shanthi Rexaline has the story on finance.yahoo.com…(Read More)

Monopolistic Unionism Makes Schools Less Effective, More Expensive ‘[Coercive] Union Strength Variable . . . Has a Substantial and Statistically Significant Negative Relationship With Student Achievement’ By Stan Greer For many years, the vast majority of Americans have rated the performance of the public schools of our nation as mediocre or worse.  By more than…(Read More)

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Forced-Dues State Households Have Less Real Income www.nilrr.org, October 22, 2018 MERIC’s annual data for 2017 show that, among the 14 states with the highest overall cost of living last year, not one has on the books and in effect a Right to Work law barring the termination of employees for…(Read More)

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Journalists Turning to Union Protection in Turbulent Times bloomberglaw.com, October 26, 2018 Unionization can be problematic when all employees are forced into a “one-size-fits-all contract,” National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation spokesman Patrick Semmens told Bloomberg Law in an email. “The problem with unionization under current U.S. labor law…(Read More)